Here I Go Again: Still Weaving

So, now I’m dusting all of my weaving supplies off again. It’s been a long time. I really haven’t used the inkle loom I bought as a college student since I was in college. Sad, sad, sad. Welp, here I go again.

I had so much fun weaving the strap for my new drawstring backpack that I decided to wind  a warp and get weaving. I had been meaning to try out the pattern that came with Jacquetta Nesbitt’s Supplementary warp patterning video lesson so I copied the pattern down and wound a warp with #10 crochet cotton. The technique was still fresh in my memory since it is the same method that I was using to weave the Lithuanian sashes. I love picking up and dropping threads while watching the pattern emerge.  Oh, and that swiping sound the beater makes when I secure the weft thread to lock the pattern in, like music.

 

It’s a work in progress. The yarn I used makes a band only half the width of the sample on the tutorial due to my yarn choice. It is only 1.5inches wide. But hey, who cares? I’m having fun. Lately I’ve been wearing my inkle bands as hair-ties just as an excuse to have them out.

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card woven band as a hair-tie

 

A few days later I thought, well my Kromski Harp Rigid Heddle loom is looking kind of lonely since I cut the bag strap off of it. I saw this as a perfect opportunity for an experiment. I decided to try one of my favorite plain weaves, houndstooth, using (gasp) acrylic knitting yarn. Not caring much about what would happen I didn’t bother overspinning the yarn. Plastic, gah. Every since I learned to spin yarn I have been a total snob against acrylic. I didn’t want to risk ruining my good stuff on an experiment (I have struggle with warping my loom in the past), so there. The rigid heddle loom is great for projects when you can’t afford a lot of loom waste. You can keep weaving all the way to the end of the warp, no problem.

Any how, I think the scarf patterning looks nice. I would use this color combo again. The acrylic made a very dense and stiff fabric. I’m kind of on the fence as to whether I will like wearing it.

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The Send-Off Sash

Earlier this month my brother-in-law was deployed to Afghanistan with the US Air Force. I decided to weave him a keepsake sash as a parting gift. The project went together nicely. The weaving technique used is called supplementary warp patterning.

The woven text is DH (His Initials) 14 (deployment year) ZIJAKERY (The acronym they use for the children Jadin, Zion, Keyin, Rylen) 2 paw prints (their cast Wiley and Tiny) and MH (My sister’s initials)

The send-off sash on the loom. Almost finished

The send-off sash on the loom. Almost finished

Send-off Sash just cut off the loom

Send-off Sash just cut off the loom

ZIJAKERY is an acronym my sister made up for their children Jadin, Zion, Keyin, Rylen

ZIJAKERY is an acronym my sister made up for their children Jadin, Zion, Keyin, Rylen

Completed Send-off Sash. The ends are machine stitched into a point and unraveled for a neat fringe finish

Completed Send-off Sash. The ends are machine stitched into a point and unraveled for a neat fringe finish

Send-off Sash. I added a blue linen backing to make it more durable and a hook for utility

Send-off Sash. I added a blue linen backing to make it more durable and a hook for utility

See You Soon!

DAvin Deployment

Congrats Grad, a gift for my sister.

My sister, Melanie graduated with a masters degree in education a few weeks ago. The plan was to make her something as a gift.
I started sewing her a dress last month, well sort of. I cut it out and then it sat in the to-do bin.

Simplicity 1417 is a really cute peplum sheath dress that I knew she would like. The dress was cut from a really cool two-tone stretch denim purchased back in my college days. It is navy with a pink undertone. Barely having enough, some of the pieces were cut from a botched pair of pants I made out of the fabric.

Simplicity 1417

Simplicity 1417

I had to cut some of the pattern pieces from a botched pair of pants made from the fabric

I had to cut some of the pattern pieces from a botched pair of pants made from the fabric

 

Before the dress was finished I was inspired to weave her a sash. I’m really falling in love with supplementary warp pattern weaving. It is lithuanian tradition to weave sashes to give away as gifts. The old sashes would be long enough to wrap around the waist.  My weaving buddy helped me to draft a pattern for a short sash with my sister’s name and graduation year.

Weaving draft

Weaving draft

I chose to use a colorway inspired by a painting me and Melanie did together. The colors are very non-traditional for this type of weaving. My friend says it has an African vibe. It didn’t take me long to veer off the beaten path.

Peony painting done at UCanPaint2 art class

Peony painting done at UCanPaint2 art class

Weaving in progress on a a traditional Lithuanian frame loom.

Weaving in progress on a a traditional Lithuanian frame loom.

Weaving close-up. Supplementary warp patterning

Weaving close-up. Supplementary warp patterning

Finished sash. I like the traditional tassles at the ends. They remind me of guppy tails:-)

Finished sash made from perle cotton. I like the traditional tassles at the ends. They remind me of guppy tails:-)

Anyhow, I love how it turned out. The sash made for a truly unique gift.

Melanie with her graduation sash

Melanie with her graduation sash

Melanie H. MAEd 2014

Melanie H. MAEd 2014

The keepsake sash with diploma

The keepsake sash with diploma

 

Now for the dress. I did finally finish and she likes it! Other than a minor alteration needed to take in the back princess seam this pattern was sewn straight out of the envelope without a fuss.

Melanie's Simplicity 1417

Melanie’s Simplicity 1417

Simplicity 1417 side

Simplicity 1417 side

Simplicity 1417 back

Simplicity 1417 back

I want to make this dress again for sure.